Living to 100!

What is your Longevity Factor?

What if you were to live until 100?

Impossible you might say? Not really and in fact living to 100 is becoming an increasingly likely outcome for many people. Check out the number of centenarians (persons over 100) in Okinawa Japan or the USA for that matter.

There exists an exceptionally well researched web site namely www.livingto100.com that you would be well advised to sign up for as soon as possible. Better yet it is completely FREE. Do it today and learn something very important about your life.

www.livingto100.com

I had highlighted this excellent web site in my original eBook on Panama written 7 years ago. It is still going strong and the questions seem to have been simplified. By answering a bunch of personal questions about everything you might imagine it will make a prediction concerning  your probable longevity …. short of getting hit by a truck.

I just did mine and it predicted 101 years. Seven years ago my score was only 97 years but then I weighed considerably more and lived in New Jersey (polluted air, extra stress etc.). Now the trick is to complete the test twice. The first time you should be completely and absolutely honest. The second time around make some small adjustments to your answers that you know would not be very difficult to achieve. Exercise a bit more, drink a bit less, eat less red meat, lose a bit of weight to get your body mass index down, try to be a bit more sociable etc. You may be very surprised to see that these minimum improvements may add 6 or 7 years to your longevity.

You Should Live So Long!

You might be of the camp that says it is not worth it. You expect that by your mid 80’s, if you should live so long, you will be suffering from one or other form of dementia making life a hell for your partner and children, spending excess money on medical care and generally living much like a vegetable. Wrong! Dementia is actually a rapidly declining threat for old age even well into your 90s. If you maintain a positive attitude and a healthy body there is no reason that you will not be painting masterpieces like Picasso at age 94 when he enjoyed an untimely death.

Three Months Every Year

Longevity is a critical factor in retirement planning and just about every other aspect of life and death. Many people are still planning to die at age 72 or 75 at the latest just like perhaps one of their parents. Their retirement financial planning horizon is also, not surprisingly, 75 giving them a very false feeling of confidence.

As you may have heard, 95 is today the new 75. Believe it! Every year for the past decade, the average longevity of the average North American has increased by about 3 months. 30 extra months in just 10 short years. Amazing! Actually, if you do the numbers for the past 160 years you will find that longevity increased by about 40 years in this period or about 3 months per year (same same as they say in Thailand) at least for some nations such as Sweden.

Beware of Boredom

A greatly extended longevity, however, is not only about having an adequate cash flow. More importantly, for many reasons, it is about “what am I going to do with all of this extra time”? There is only so much time you can spend watching football games and soap operas. It is a well-known fact that one of the biggest killers in retirement is “boredom” plain and simple. That is a condition reached when you believe you can finally turn off your mind. Because you are doing very little or perhaps nothing you first become rather bored by yourself and then, for stage two, you become boring with everyone else and in stage three you fade off quietly into the night.

However, now that you realize that you have a reasonable chance to become a super-centenarian (110 or over) plan on it. Develop a daily routine with goals and activities that have a very, very long time horizon. Your life will be much the richer for it.

Cheers

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